The PADSIS Blog

If you were a PADSIS member you would be able to view this content. Membership starts at just £49.Click to join PADSISRugby Retention Survey January 2019

Posted: Wednesday, 06 March 2019

Purpose The purpose of the survey was to track levels of contact Rugby participation in independent school, and the rate of attrition in each year group. The aspiration was to provide schools with a benchmark for the retention level of their programmes. Results Percentage of boys in each year group playing contact Rugby Football Year Group Day Schools Day/Boarding* Boarding 7 94 80   8 82 72   9 46 64 94 10 38 55 90 11 31 48 73 12 28 35 55 13 27 34 50 *Defined as a school with at least 25% pupils boarding, and at least 25% day Commentary In most independent schools, the proportion of pupils taking part in contact Rugby declines significantly in teenage years. The game is played by an overwhelming majority of pupils in their first two years in each school, though a minority by the Sixth Form.  Except in the full boarding sector, the game is not a majority activity in Year 11 or Sixth Form.  This probably reflects increasing freedom of choice, and range of...

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If you were a PADSIS member you would be able to view this content. Membership starts at just £49.Click to join PADSISTeaching the Love of Running

Posted: Thursday, 01 February 2018

Most small children love running.  They need little encouragement to do so. Primary, and prep, school playgrounds are full of the constant buzz of physical activity.  PE lessons featuring running and athletic activities are enthusiastically pursued. Fast forward ten years.  The great majority of adolescents are reluctant runners.  House Cross Country events rarely present a school at its best.  Lessons with a substantial running component quickly categorise themselves into the compliant athletes, the reluctant runners and the early walkers.  And yet another ten years further on, many of the same people have returned to running. Park Run, Race for Life, Fun Runs: all these worthy initiatives re-engage the teenage refusers as adults. Mysteriously.  So, what changes at these various stages? First, might be the perception of value.  Running is not an activity that is imaginatively presented to children.  The concept of "cross country" is not a universally attractive one.  When schools...

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If you were a PADSIS member you would be able to view this content. Membership starts at just £49.Click to join PADSISThe Intoxicating Place of Risk Taking in School Sport

Posted: Friday, 13 October 2017

Adventure has always been part of being human.  From the early explorers who discovered that the world wasn’t as flat as it seemed, through to the invention of the Gap year.  Discovery, surprise and uncertainty have always held appeal.  Unpredictability is always potentially exciting or terrifying – and has been since dinosaurs roamed the planet. This human inclination is repressed by a risk assessment culture.  The principle of foreseeing and denying risk is at odds with the fundamental appeal of novelty and discovery.  It might be sensible and functional, but it opposes the human desire for excitement. A risk averse world needs sports, games and adventure activities to fulfil this need.  But there is a fundamental difference between sport which reflects adventure, and that which is itself risk averse.  The teams and players that captured the heart and imagination  throughout history are not those that were efficient and error free.  Though this approach might win competitive success...

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If you were a PADSIS member you would be able to view this content. Membership starts at just £49.Click to join PADSIS“They Have Been Telling us the Answer for Years: ‘Please Sir, Can We Have a Game?’”

Posted: Thursday, 05 October 2017

The industry of sport coaching is a recently evolved one.  Before the 1970s, few teams had anything that could be described as a coach. Other than to transport them to the game. Indeed, many would have been offended by the implication of the concept.  Perhaps more shocking, cones had not been invented.  Any rudimentary team organisation was overseen by the captain. “Game Plans” and “Systems” were in their absolute infancy. Fifty years have seen a huge cultural shift.  No self respecting team would be without a coach, whatever its performance level.  Player dependency is absolute: coach centricity is unquestioned.  At all levels of every game, the expectation of all is that the coach gives the instructions, and the players follow them.  This is not just before the game. It has become the industry norm that the coach maintains a constant commentary of advice and observation (to players and officials) throughout the game.  Research identifies that some coaches shout for 80% of the match...

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